Chatham county sex offenders registry


13-May-2018 22:42

*No representation is made that the person listed here is currently on the state's offenders registry.

All names presented here were gathered at a past date.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the Georgia Sex Offender Registry is accurate.

§ 42-1-12, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) is the central repository for Georgia's Violent Sexual Offender Registry.

(b) Unless a different classification is expressly stated, a person who solicits another person to commit a misdemeanor is guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. Punishment of misdemeanors, infamous offenses, offenses committed in secrecy and malice, or with deceit and intent to defraud, or with ethnic animosity.

(a) Unless a different classification is expressly stated, a person who solicits another person to commit a felony is guilty of a felony that is two classes lower than the felony the person solicited the other person to commit, except that a solicitation to commit a Class A or Class B1 felony is a Class C felony, a solicitation to commit a Class B2 felony is a Class D felony, a solicitation to commit a Class H felony is a Class 1 misdemeanor, and a solicitation to commit a Class I felony is a Class 2 misdemeanor.

(b) An action to recover such property shall be brought by either a District Attorney or the Attorney General pursuant to G. (c) Nothing in this section shall be construed to require forfeiture of any money or property recovered by law-enforcement officers pursuant to the investigation of an offense when the money or property is readily identifiable by the owner or guardian of the property or is traceable to him. (b) Unless a different classification is expressly stated, a person who is convicted of a conspiracy to commit a misdemeanor is guilty of a misdemeanor that is one class lower than the misdemeanor he or she conspired to commit, except that a conspiracy to commit a Class 3 misdemeanor is a Class 3 misdemeanor. Punishment for attempt to commit a felony or misdemeanor.

A felony is a crime which: (1) Was a felony at common law; (2) Is or may be punishable by death; (3) Is or may be punishable by imprisonment in the State's prison; or (4) Is denominated as a felony by statute. (a) Except as is otherwise provided in Article 3 of Chapter 31A, in the case of any violation of Article 13A of Chapter 14, or a general statute constituting a felony other than a nonwillful homicide, any money or other property or interest in property acquired thereby shall be forfeited to the State of North Carolina, including any profits, gain, remuneration, or compensation directly or indirectly collected by or accruing to any offender. The action must be brought within three years from the date of the conviction for the offense. (a) Unless a different classification is expressly stated, a person who is convicted of a conspiracy to commit a felony is guilty of a felony that is one class lower than the felony he or she conspired to commit, except that a conspiracy to commit a Class A or Class B1 felony is a Class B2 felony, a conspiracy to commit a Class B2 felony is a Class C felony, and a conspiracy to commit a Class I felony is a Class 1 misdemeanor.

Chatham county sex offenders registry-71

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Some addresses or other data might no longer be current.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZAdjournment – multiple adjournment applications – inadequate medical certificates – accumulating delays – repeated non-compliance with case management directions – Tribunal resources under sustained pressure – prejudice to defendant – whether further adjournment to be granted – dismissal of proceedings Authorised or required by an enactment or otherwise by law – application of Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004 – guiding principles – whether to be taken into account – Human Rights Act 1993, s 21B(1) – Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004, s 4 – Health and Disability Services (Safety) Act 2001 – NZS 8181 Fertility Services – Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights, Rights 1, 2, 4 and 6Authorised or required by an enactment or otherwise by law – duty of health care provider to exercise reasonable care and skill – whether duty to decline to provide services if provision of services sought beyond experience and skill levels – Human Rights Act 1993, s 21B(1) – Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights, Right 4Authority to bring proceedings – authority to act – when necessary to file – lawyer’s authority to file documents – authority of lay agent or representative – whether necessary to establish – Human Rights Act ss 104(5) and 108(3) – Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006, ss 27(1) and 39(1) – High Court Rules, r 5.37Back to top Causation – by reason of – whether prohibited ground of discrimination required to be only a material ingredient rather than a substantial and operative factor – Human Rights Act 1993, s 22(1)(c)Costs – litigant in person delusional – relevance of mental disability in context of costs application – successful party represented by agent, not lawyer – whether costs other than disbursements could be awarded Costs – principles to be applied – whether Tribunal to depart from civil rule that costs follow the event – whether costs discretion must promote, not negate objects of Human Rights Act 1993 – whether discretion to be exercised in a way which may discourage individuals from bringing proceedings – plaintiff filing discontinuance – whether presumption costs to be awarded defendant – Human Rights Act 1993, s 92LCosts – principles to be applied – whether costs to punish unsuccessful party – whether costs to discourage party from bringing or defending proceedings – whether litigants in person who engage in needless and inexcusable conduct enjoy immunity – whether understanding and compassion relevant – Privacy Act 1993, s 85(2)Costs – relevance of implementation at domestic level of international obligations – responsibility of State to respect and ensure – principle of access to justice – relevance of public importance of case – public interest and the award of costs by the Tribunal – relevance of motivation of unsuccessful plaintiff – Human Rights Act 1993, s 92LCosts – representation on a fee paying basis but quantum not fixed and if plaintiff unsuccessful fee would be waived – whether necessary for successful party to have received or paid a bill of costs – impecunious plaintiff – whether withholding costs would discourage – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 92L and 105Costs – unsuccessful plaintiff a litigant in person – need for Tribunal’s processes and procedures to be adapted to ensure lay litigants not unduly deterred by prospect of adverse award of costs – access to justice – withholding provisions – challenge to application of – role of Tribunal in withholding cases – importance of Tribunal’s oversight – relevance of when agency applies for costs – Privacy Act 1993, ss 27 to 29 and 85(2)Delay by Tribunal issuing decision – reasons for – unprecedented increase in workload – need for Deputy Chairperson(s) to be appointed – Human Rights Act in urgent need of amendment to allow this to be done – Human Rights Act 1993, s 102(1)Discovery – continuing process – whether ruling on one aspect of discovery inhibits ruling on different aspect – confidentiality interests – whether such interests trump need for Tribunal to get at the truth and need to combat discrimination – whether confidentiality concerns can be addressed by different mechanisms – significance of undertaking – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 105 and 107 – Evidence Act 2006, s 69Discovery – discovery against non-party – jurisdiction to order – procedure to be followed – whether order for particular discovery against non-party the only means to gain access to documents held by non-party – subpoena duces tecum – witness summons requiring production of papers, documents, records or things – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 104(5), 106(1)(a), (b) and (c) and 109 – Human Rights Review Tribunal Regulations, reg 16(1) – High Court Rules, rr 8.21 and 9.52Discovery – right to be free from discrimination versus confidentiality interests of third party – assessment of – whether probative value outweighed by confidentiality interest – relevance of redaction of document and the giving of undertaking by party seeking discovery – Evidence Act 2006, s 69Discrimination – age – whether established on facts – choice of comparator – material disadvantage – whether disadvantage beyond direct loss must be established – Accident Compensation Act 2001, Schedule 1, Part 4, cl 68Discrimination – disability – attribution of characteristics of disabled person to comparator group – taking away characteristics of disabled person from disabled group – Human Rights Act 1993, s 21(1)(h)Discrimination – exception where qualification needed for a calling for the purposes of an organised religion and limited to one sex or to persons of that religious belief so as to comply with the doctrines or rules or established customs of that religion – meaning of – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 38 and 39(1)Discrimination – marital status – unmarried de facto relationship – sexual orientation – Human Rights Act 1993, s 21(1)(b) and (m) – Marriage Act 1955, s 29(2) – Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Act 2013, s 4Discrimination – physical disability or impairment – whether necessary to prove intention in sense of motive or purpose to engage in prohibited discrimination – termination of employment – whether relevant that procedure fair or reasonable – relevance of 90 day trial period – remedy – Human Rights Act 1993, s 22(1)Discrimination – provision of goods and services – whether comparator required – by reason of – whether causative link required – whether material factor test to be applied – selection of comparator group – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 21(2)(b) and 44(1)(a) and (b)Dismissal of proceedings – proceedings brought before Tribunal in relation to matter not the subject of a complaint to the Human Rights Commission – whether Tribunal had jurisdiction – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 76(2)(a) and 92BEmployment – discrimination – religious practice – observance of Sabbath – employer’s duty to accommodate – unreasonably disrupt employer’s activities – interpretation of – whether evidential foundation required – nature of duty on employer – relevance of detrimental effect on employee morale – whether account to be taken of need to provide equal access to workforce of people who would otherwise encounter barriers to entry – burden of proof – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 22, 28(3), 35 and 92F(2)Evidence – appearance of witness or participant by audio-visual link (AVL) – whether jurisdiction to permit – principles and criteria to be applied – Human Rights Act 1993, s 104(5) – Courts (Remote Participation) Act 2010, ss 5 and 7 – Evidence Act 2006, ss 102 to 105Evidence – counsel appearing by audio-visual link (AVL) – whether jurisdiction to permit – principles and criteria to be applied – Courts (Remote Participation) Act 2010, ss 5 and 7 – Evidence Act 2006, ss 102 to 105Back to top Freedom of expression – importance of – permissible restrictions – framework of analysis – Moonen or Hansen – Human Rights Act 1993, s 61 – Interpretation Act 1999, s 5 – New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990, ss 4, 5, 6, 14 and 19 – International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, 1965, Articles 4 and 5 – International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 1966, Article 19 – European Convention on Human Rights, 1950, Article 10Back to top Granting of remedies by High Court on reference from Tribunal – decision of High Court on remedies to be included and given effect to as part of Tribunal’s determination – Human Rights Act 1993, s 92T(5) and 92U(1)Back to top Immigration – prohibition on bringing of complaint under Human Rights Act 1993 in respect of content or application of Immigration Act 2009 or immigration instructions – whether prohibits also access to Tribunal – Human Rights Act 1993, s 92B – Immigration Act 2009, s 392In-Court media coverage – camera in court – filming of witnesses while in court or giving evidence – filming of balance of proceedings – whether permitted – In-Court Media Coverage Guidelines 2012 – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 105(2)(b) and 107 – New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990, s 14Interim order application – interim orders against the Crown – jurisdiction to make – whether mandatory orders against the Crown can be made by Chairperson on interim order application – Human Rights Act 1993, s 95 – Crown Proceedings Act 1950, s 17Interim order application – that the Ministry of Health reverse a direction to decline new referrals for Ministry-funded day services – that the Tribunal confirm that certain service users were eligible for needs-based referral for Ministry-funded day services – reference made to High Court – whether power to make interim order affected by reference to High Court – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 92R and 95Jurisdiction – requirement of a complaint – notification of complaint to person complained against – whether jurisdiction of Tribunal confined to complaint as lodged with Human Rights Commission – Human Rights Act 1993, Part 3 and ss 75, 76 and 92BJurisdiction – strike-out application – claim statute barred – complaint about a judgment or other order of a court or an act or omission of a court affecting conduct of any proceedings – whether proceedings can be brought before Tribunal – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 79(3) and 92B(7)Jurisdiction – whether Tribunal has jurisdiction in relation to New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and other statutes over and above its jurisdiction under the Human Rights Act 1993, Privacy Act 1993 and Health and Disability Commissioner Act 1994Back to top Media – access to Tribunal file – whether principle of open justice to be turned into an enforceable right to fair and accurate reporting – whether discretion to control access a discretion to control reporting by media – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 105, 107(1) and 108(1) – High Court Rules, Part 3, Subpart 2, rr 3.5 to 3.16Mediation – confidentiality – rationale of duty of confidentiality – significance to dispute resolution process under Part 3 Human Rights Act 1993 – significance of Tribunal’s power to refer complaint back to Human Rights Commission – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 75, 83, 85, 86, 87, 92D and 107(1)Back to top Name suppression – disclosure of information regarding state of health – whether a highly personal matter – recognition of wish to maintain the confidentiality of that information – Human Rights Act 1993, s 107(3) and the Privacy Act 1993, s 89Name suppression – open justice principle – countervailing interests – principles to be applied – relevance of confidentiality obligation in mediation context – relevance of interim order decision in determining whether final order to be made – public interest in knowing mediated settlements may be enforced by Tribunal – weight to be given to damage to political career and reputation – Human Rights Act, s 107(3)Name suppression – open justice principle – interests of justice – principles to be applied – interpretation and application of s 107 Human Rights Act 1993 – meaning of “special circumstances” and “desirable” – summary of correct approach to applications for name suppression – Human Rights Act 1993, s 107(2) and (3)Name suppression – principles to be applied – open justice principle – effect of recent Court of Appeal judgments – whether exceptional circumstances must be established to justify suppression – whether threshold high – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 95(1) and 107(3)Name suppression – protection of right to fair trial – whether right applies in context of civil proceedings – test for when right at risk – reconciling right to fair trial and freedom of expression – who to decide – powers of High Court compared with powers of Tribunal – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 95(1) and 107(3) – Human Rights Committee, General Comment No.

32 (Article 14: Right to equality before courts and tribunals and to a fair trial) (2007) at para [2]Name suppression – open justice principle – interests of justice – principles to be applied – interpretation and application of s 107 Human Rights Act 1993 – meaning of “special circumstances” and “desirable” – summary of correct approach to applications for name suppression – Human Rights Act 1993, s 107(2) and (3)Name suppression – interests of justice – relevance of delay by applicant – relevance of public interest where Pharmacy Council has placed conditions on plaintiff’s participation in the pharmacy industry requiring plaintiff to disclose to any employer that he is under investigation by a Professional Conduct Committee and that he must work under a Council-approved supervisor at all times – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 95(1) and 107(2) and (3) – Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003, s 3Non-Party access to Tribunal file – complaint referred back to Human Rights Commission for mediation – statutory attachment of confidentiality to mediation – effect on open justice principle and on media access to Tribunal file during mediation process – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 75, 83, 85, 86, 87, 92D and 107(1) – High Court Rules, Part 3, Subpart 2, rr 3.13 and 3.16Non-party access to Tribunal file – law to be applied – whether principle of open justice to be turned into an enforceable right to fair and accurate reporting – whether discretion to control access a discretion to control reporting by media – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 105, 107(1) and 108(1) – High Court Rules, Part 3, Subpart 2, rr 3.5 to 3.16Back to top Part 1A – alleged breach – analytical framework – Hansen test – discrimination test – comparator – justified limitations test – Human Rights Act 1993, ss 19 and 20L – New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990, s 6Racial disharmony – history of provision – whether under ICERD 1965 and ICCPR 1966 right to be free from hate speech and right to freedom of expression absolute rights – permissible restrictions – framework of analysis – Moonen or Hansen – meaning of "insult", "contempt" and "likely" – whether an objective test – Human Rights Act 1993, s 61 – Interpretation Act 1999, s 5 – New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990, ss 4, 5, 6, 14 and 19 – International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, 1965, Articles 4 and 5 – International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 1966, Article 19 – European Convention on Human Rights, 1950, Article 10Referral of complaint back to Human Rights Commission – mediation – proceedings under Part 1A alleging statutory provision imposes unlawful limitation on freedom from discrimination – application by Ministry of Social Development – MSD having previously refused to mediate – whether referral to HRC appropriate to assist parties to prepare for litigation before Tribunal – advancing age of plaintiffs – whether referral will contribute constructively to resolving the complaint or be in the public interest – Human Rights Act 1993, s 92D(1)Religion – right to manifest – observance of the Sabbath – International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, Article 18 – Human Rights Committee General Comment No.

Click here to view a slideshow containing photos of registered sex offenders in Liberty County.

Click here to view a slideshow containing photos of registered sex offenders in Bulloch County.

In an effort to enhance the effectiveness and uniformity with which this critical function is met throughout the state, the Georgia Sheriffs’ Association initiated steps to assist in this demanding task.



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